{$smarty} reserved variable

The PHP reserved {$smarty} variable can be used to access several environment and request variables. The full list of them follows.

Request variables

The request variables such as $_GET, $_POST, $_COOKIE, $_SERVER, $_ENV and $_SESSION can be accessed as demonstrated in the examples below:

Example 4.8. Displaying request variables

{* display value of page from URL ($_GET) http://www.example.com/index.php?page=foo *}
{$smarty.get.page}

{* display the variable "page" from a form ($_POST['page']) *}
{$smarty.post.page}

{* display the value of the cookie "username" ($_COOKIE['username']) *}
{$smarty.cookies.username}

{* display the server variable "SERVER_NAME" ($_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'])*}
{$smarty.server.SERVER_NAME}

{* display the system environment variable "PATH" *}
{$smarty.env.PATH}

{* display the php session variable "id" ($_SESSION['id']) *}
{$smarty.session.id}

{* display the variable "username" from merged get/post/cookies/server/env *}
{$smarty.request.username}

   

Note

For historical reasons {$SCRIPT_NAME} is short-hand for {$smarty.server.SCRIPT_NAME}.

<a href="{$SCRIPT_NAME}?page=smarty">click me</a>
<a href="{$smarty.server.SCRIPT_NAME}?page=smarty">click me</a>

Note

Although Smarty provides direct access to PHP super globals for convenience, it should be used with caution. Directly accessing super globals mixes underlying application code structure with templates. A good practice is to assign specific needed values to template vars.

{$smarty.now}

The current timestamp can be accessed with {$smarty.now}. The value reflects the number of seconds passed since the so-called Epoch on January 1, 1970, and can be passed directly to the date_format modifier for display. Note that time() is called on each invocation; eg a script that takes three seconds to execute with a call to $smarty.now at start and end will show the three second difference.

{* use the date_format modifier to show current date and time *}
{$smarty.now|date_format:'%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S'}

   

{$smarty.const}

You can access PHP constant values directly. See also smarty constants.

<?php
// the constant defined in php
define('MY_CONST_VAL','CHERRIES');
?>

Output the constant in a template with

{$smarty.const.MY_CONST_VAL}

Note

Although Smarty provides direct access to PHP constants for convenience, it is typically avoided as this is mixing underlying application code structure into the templates. A good practice is to assign specific needed values to template vars.

{$smarty.capture}

Template output captured via the built-in {capture}..{/capture} function can be accessed using the {$smarty.capture} variable. See the {capture} page for more information.

{$smarty.config}

{$smarty.config} variable can be used to refer to loaded config variables. {$smarty.config.foo} is a synonym for {#foo#}. See the {config_load} page for more info.

{$smarty.section}

The {$smarty.section} variables can be used to refer to {section} loop properties. These have some very useful values such as .first, .index, etc.

Note

The {$smarty.foreach} variable is no longer used with the new {foreach} syntax, but is still supported with Smarty 2.x style foreach syntax.

{$smarty.template}

Returns the name of the current template being processed (without the directory).

{$smarty.template_object}

Returns the template object of the current template being processed.

{$smarty.current_dir}

Returns the name of the directory for the current template being processed.

{$smarty.version}

Returns the version of Smarty the template was compiled with.

<div id="footer">Powered by Smarty {$smarty.version}</div>

{$smarty.block.child}

Returns block text from child template. See Template interitance.

{$smarty.block.parent}

Returns block text from parent template. See Template interitance

{$smarty.ldelim}, {$smarty.rdelim}

These variables are used for printing the left-delimiter and right-delimiter value literally, the same as {ldelim},{rdelim}.

See also assigned variables and config variables